Deep Dive: An AllMusicBooks Podcast
Episode 45: “Sittin’ In: Jazz Clubs of the 1940s and 1950s” with Jeff Gold

Episode 45: “Sittin’ In: Jazz Clubs of the 1940s and 1950s” with Jeff Gold

January 19, 2021

In his new book "Sittin' In," Grammy Award-winning record executive and music historian Jeff Gold brings to life the renowned jazz nightclubs of the 1940s and 1950s in an astounding visual history of American music.

Gold talks to us about this explosive moment in the history of Jazz and expounds on these spaces as the center of artistic and social change. These clubs formed a profoundly inclusive and communal scene in American culture and music during a time of otherwise widespread segregation.

Episode 44: “Cover Me: The Stories Behind the Greatest Cover Songs of All Time” with Ray Padgett

Episode 44: “Cover Me: The Stories Behind the Greatest Cover Songs of All Time” with Ray Padgett

January 5, 2021

Everyone loves cover songs. And a great cover often makes a song stronger. Why is that? Author Ray Padgett, of the website www.covermesongs.com, lets us in on the origins of classic covers — and tells the larger story of how cover songs have evolved over the decades.

The Beatles made “Twist and Shout” famous, but who did it first? Where did the Righteous Brothers "Unchained Melody" come from? Aretha Franklin demanded “Respect,” Patti Smith blew up "Gloria," DEVO deconstructed "Satisfaction," and Talking Heads recast Al Green's "Take Me To The River." Hear more from Ray in this episode!

Episode 43: “Have Yourself A Merry Little Holiday” 2020

Episode 43: “Have Yourself A Merry Little Holiday” 2020

December 21, 2020

The two Steves thank you for your support. We'll be back in January and here's a sneak peak as to what's coming! Plus a *great* version of a Holiday classic from our friends Frankie and The Poolboys! Enjoy!

Episode 42: “Becoming Jimi Hendrix: From Southern Crossroads to Psychedelic London” with Brad Schreiber

Episode 42: “Becoming Jimi Hendrix: From Southern Crossroads to Psychedelic London” with Brad Schreiber

December 11, 2020

Becoming Jimi Hendrix traces “Jimmy’s” early musical roots, from a harrowing, hand-to-mouth upbringing in a poverty-stricken, broken Seattle home to his stint as a reluctant recruit of the 101st Airborne who was magnetically drawn to the rhythm and blues scene in Nashville. As a sideman, Hendrix played with the likes of Little Richard, Ike and Tina Turner, the Isley Brothers, and Sam & Dave — but none knew what to make of his spotlight-stealing rock guitar experimentation, the likes of which had never been heard before.

Author Brad Schreiber walks us through these formative years, as Hendrix developed his style in the rough and tumble clubs of Nashville, New York, and London, where he would break through and become the world's greatest rock'n'roll guitar player.

Episode 41: “So Much Things To Say: The Oral History of Bob Marley” with Roger Steffens (Pt. 2)

Episode 41: “So Much Things To Say: The Oral History of Bob Marley” with Roger Steffens (Pt. 2)

December 10, 2020

Roger Steffens is one of the world’s leading Bob Marley and reggae music experts. His book So Much Things To Say is a revelatory, one-of-a-kind oral history on the life and music of the legendary Rasta prophet, told in the words of those who knew him best.

Part 2:

Steffens takes us on Bob's journey from Kingston slums to Madison Square Garden, through the major controversies of Marley's life, examining who actually ordered the assassination attempt on his life, scrutinizing claims of CIA involvement and investigating why Bob Marley’s fatal cancer wasn’t diagnosed sooner. And, of course, the incredible music Bob Marley left behind.

Episode 40: “So Much Things To Say: The Oral History of Bob Marley” by Roger Steffens (Pt. 1)

Episode 40: “So Much Things To Say: The Oral History of Bob Marley” by Roger Steffens (Pt. 1)

November 13, 2020

Roger Steffens is one of the world’s leading Bob Marley and reggae music experts. His book "So Much Things To Say" is a revelatory, one-of-a-kind oral history on the life and music of the legendary Rasta prophet, told in the words of those who knew him best.

Part 1:

Roger takes us through Bob Marley’s early days, and the formation of the original Wailin’ Wailers. Bob, Peter Tosh, and Bunny Wailer were a unique combination, and we learn what each brought to the table, to their music, and what led to the dissolution of this classic trio.

Episode 39: “I’m Your Fan: The Songs Of Leonard Cohen” with Ray Padgett

Episode 39: “I’m Your Fan: The Songs Of Leonard Cohen” with Ray Padgett

October 27, 2020

Leonard Cohen's record label refused to release his 1984 album Various Positions —which included the song "Hallelujah" — in the United States. Luckily, Velvet Underground founder John Cale was one of the few who did hear "Hallelujah," and he covered it for I'm Your Fan. Jeff Buckley would hear that version, and take the song into the stratosphere.

Author Ray Padgett talks about that album and about tribute albums as a whole and what they mean to the record business. Good, bad, and worse, Ray goes deep into this unique and very popular subset of the industry. 

Episode 38: “Into The Never: Nine Inch Nails and the Creation of The Downward Spiral” with Adam Steiner

Episode 38: “Into The Never: Nine Inch Nails and the Creation of The Downward Spiral” with Adam Steiner

October 13, 2020

Author Adam Steiner joins us to talk about the creation and cultural impact of Nine Inch Nails' album "The Downward Spiral," one of the most influential and artistically significant albums of the twentieth century.

Steiner goes deep into Trent Reznor and his state of mind during the recording process, the deeply disturbing music and videos he created, and the chilling location where the album was recorded.

Episode 37: “Music Is Power: Popular Songs, Social Justice, and The Will to Change” with Brad Schreiber

Episode 37: “Music Is Power: Popular Songs, Social Justice, and The Will to Change” with Brad Schreiber

September 29, 2020

Author Brad Schreiber takes us on a guided tour through the past 100 years of politically-conscious music, from Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger and Bob Dylan to the Bob Marley, the Dead Kennedys and NWA.

Covering a wide variety of genres, including reggae, country, psychedelia, rap, punk, folk and soul, Schreiber tells fascinating stories about the origins and the impact of dozens of world-changing songs, while revealing political context and the personal challenges of these legendary artists.

Episode 36: “Gunning For Hits” with Jeff Rougvie

Episode 36: “Gunning For Hits” with Jeff Rougvie

September 15, 2020

In this episode, we stretch out a bit and examine "Gunning For Hits," a music-based graphic novel series. Set in the shady New York City scene of the mid-80s, this music business thriller stars Martin Mills, a record company talent scout with an inscrutable past, and his attempts to sign a rock band that will conquer the world.

Author and creator Jeff Rougvie knows his stuff. He was the former Director of A&R for Rykodisc, one of the great independent music labels. He worked with both David Bowie, Elvis Costello, and Frank Zappa, amongst many other artists, to bring their catalog reissues to compact disc on the innovative label. Rougvie takes us inside the the music business, his Gunning For Hits series, and the world of graphic novels.

Play this podcast on Podbean App